Can anyone recommend a sewing machine?

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  • #13299 Score: 0
    FaySchool
    Participant
    2 pts

    Dear Community,

    I am researching sewing machines to be used in conjunction with a Kniterate machine so we can attach sleeves to sweaters. The machine will be located in a Maker Space and used by faculty and students in a middle school. Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!!

    #13304 Score: 0
    markmark
    Participant
    86 pts

    Don’t know if she read the posts here, so I’ll share what Olgalyn Jolly, who is receiving one of the first machines, has written in the past.

    Not a recommendation of a specific machine, but beyond the machine a walking foot sounds like an important accessory

    http://www.craftingfashion.com/2013/06/sewing-sweater-seams-sewing-machine.html

    #13306 Score: 0
    markmark
    Participant
    86 pts
    #13318 Score: 0
    Magiccat11
    Participant
    4 pts

    What would be easier a sewing machine or a Hauge LinLinker.

    #13320 Score: 0
    Anne KellnbergerAnne Kellnberger
    Participant
    23 pts

    Hi everyone,

    For high-quality knitwear you use a linker instead of a sewing machine. The linker creates a chain stitch which is very secure and can be made with yarn instead of sewing thread but also is easy to unravel if needed.
    A linker has several needles around it where you can pin the knit on stitch by stitch to create a professional finish.

    If you’re interested in domestic linkers, there’s just ‘Hague’ from the UK. There might be some older domestic linkers on Ebay as well but most of them don’t get manufactured anymore.
    We haven’t tested the right linker from Hague yet but I would go for Hague D280FE10 FINE GAUGE ELECTRIC LINKER.

    Industrial linkers are bigger and more expensive but also have more power. There’s an Italian brand called ‘Complett’. Especially for double bed fabrics a good choice.

    I think you could find them second hand as well.

    Best wishes
    Anne

    #13325 Score: 0
    FaySchool
    Participant
    2 pts

    Wow, thanks to everyone for replying quickly and with great advice – much appreciated.
    All the best,
    David

    #13305 Score: 0
    markmark
    Participant
    86 pts

    Don’t know if she read the posts here, so I’ll share what Olgalyn Jolly, who is receiving one of the first machines, has written in the past.

    Not a recommendation of a specific machine, but beyond the machine a walking foot sounds like an important accessory

    http://www.craftingfashion.com/2013/06/sewing-sweater-seams-sewing-machine.html
    https://www.craftingfashion.com/2019/01/sewing-machines-for-sewing-sweater-knits.html

    #13663 Score: 0
    Anne KellnbergerAnne Kellnberger
    Participant
    23 pts

    Hi @mark,

    I wouldn’t recommend using a sewing machine for knitwear.

    If you want to do cut&sew you would use an overlocker. But for fully fashioned shaping (knitted in shape) which is the professional (and zero waste) way to create knitted garments, you use a linker. With a linker, you can use yarn instead of sewing thread.

    #13689 Score: 2
    markmark
    Participant
    86 pts

    I realize a linker is likely to give the most professional results. And, yes I have more then one.

    But many folks are content with the results of cut-and-sew with a sewing machine. And the realities of a community based maker space may argue for a simpler techniques and solutions that gets people thinking about accessible projects they can complete at home. $700 fine guage linkers versus $15 walking foot for the old singer machine in the sewing closet at home.

    https://workshop.ojolly.net (I’ll add a strong recommendation for the online course)
    “What equipment do I need? Do I need a serger (overlocker)?
    We’ll be using standard tools that you probably already have on hand or are easily acquired. A serger is not necessary, as there will be alternative ways of seaming and finishing seam allowances cleanly.”

    Since Olgalyn Jolly is getting one of the first machines, hopefully we will all get a blog post (or two, pretty please) showing offer her techniques and results.

    Triambak Saxenamarian
    #13724 Score: 3
    oj
    Participant
    14 pts

    @mark,thanks for the shout out! My Crafting Fashion blog is strictly for home sewists, so yes, the info could be just right for a community-based group. There are several ways to finish cut edges without an overlocker/serger. The nicer ones last a long time, take a longer time to execute, and would never be done in industry. I’ve promoted these methods to sewing enthusiasts and to the domestic machine knitters who don’t enjoy doing shaping on their machines. The techniques make handmade sweaters accessible to many.

    But nothing beats a fully fashioned sweater! Plans are for my own work with the Kniterate to begin with swatches and full fashioned garments. I’ll be blogging about these on my main site. There will be a few cut and sew blog posts down the road to support my students. I’ll also continue to produce fabrics for my home sewing clients.

    -Olgalyn

    Triambak SaxenamarkJitters14
    #13976 Score: 1
    marianmarian
    Participant
    1 pt

    Thanks for sharing your tips, oj.
    Maybe that’s not quite on topic, but since I’m not an industrial sewist (waiting for our local club to order a kniterate, but as for now we are working with a much more simplistic knitting machines), I can only say that without a serger you can use basic stitches to complete your projects. Usually shallowish zig-zag with enough give for the garment will do just fine (both for machine-knitting and hand-knitting), Fay. The main issue is to avoid stretching out the edge, so a light foot pressure is certainly a good idea.

    Triambak Saxena
    #14410 Score: 0
    camilahenry
    Participant

    My mother bought this recently Singer Heavy Duty 4423 through coupon codify

    #14419 Score: 0
    alyssagrey93
    Participant

    Huh I have always been interested in a Singer. It s an amazing machine

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